North Korea to Aim Test Missile at Australia

A senior United States official says a long-range missile which North Korea plans to test next month will for the first time be aimed towards South-East Asia and Australia.

The assistant secretary of state for East Asia and the Pacific, Kurt Campbell, says the US believes the North Korean missile will land in an area between Australia, Indonesia and the Philippines.

Previous North Korean rockets have been launched over Japan.

Fairfax reported on Saturday that Mr Campbell delivered the message in person to Foreign Minister Bob Carr.

“If the missile test proceeds as North Korea has indicated, our judgment is that it will impact in an area roughly between Australia, Indonesia and the Philippines,” Mr Campbell was quoted as saying.

“We have weighed into each of these countries and asked them to make clear that such a test is provocative and this plan should be discontinued.”

Nuclear-armed North Korea plans to launch the rocket in April to put a satellite into orbit, a move the US, Australia and other nations see as a pretext for a long-range missile test banned by the United Nations.

The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) says it is deeply concerned by North Korea’s plans.

A spokesperson for DFAT says the government registered concerns with the North Korean ambassador to Australia in Jakarta on Friday.

Senator Carr says North Korea’s nuclear and long-range missile programs present a “real and credible threat to the security of the region and Australia”.

He says the planned satellite launch will be a clear breach of UN Security Council resolutions.

Prime Minister Julia Gillard will be among other world leaders invited to South Korea next week for nuclear security talks.

Ms Gillard on Wednesday moved a lower house motion to renew Australia’s commitment to the eradication of all nuclear weapons.

UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon is expected to raise North Korea’s rocket launch at the meeting on Monday and Tuesday.

 

ABC/AAP

 

Original: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-03-24/north-korean-missiles-aimed-at-australia/3910342

You can comment this article, but links are not allowed.

1 комментарий к записи “North Korea to Aim Test Missile at Australia”

  1. Ricardo says:

    I read about this missile, and it seems to me North Korea is just miakng more threats and demands in order to start a war. That way, it puts NK’s opposing forces across as the bad guys. Until then, no missiles will be fired on either side.I’ve done a lot of research into whether China would back North Korea, and I can safely conclude that it wouldn’t. For one thing, China has North Korea on a pretty tight leash it supplies its oil at below-market prices, and it has a very big influence on the countries decisions. China does not want to go to war with the U.S.A either, because their exports to the US practically keep the country running. There’s no way China could finance a war without U.S money from exports. Plus the fact that China condemns North Korea’s nuclear tests, saying that they are a threat and China will always play a “constructive role”, meaning that no wars will be started.I think Japan is becoming a lot like the western world in its policies and way of running the country. Japan isn’t exactly very friendly with North Korea right now due to multiple missile tests into the Japanese sea. Plus the fact that North Korea has refused to pay certain things to Japan, which it still owes, and Japan spends US$50 billion for military expenditure, whereas NK only spends US$5.5 billion. South Korea will not help because it desperately wishes for peace between the two nations, but if North Korea becomes even more tyrannous and begins an invasion the South will fight back.Unfortunately I think the USA would be alone in this war. The UN would certainly get involved, as would NATO, but they would merely get politically involved, not go over there and sort them out physically. China would demand peace and negotiation on both sides, and Britain will not get involved in any sense apart from politically, it’s such a far away war to begin with, and due to it’s current economic climate. The War on Terror is really thinning troops out too, nevermind sending them to North Korea Iraq and Afghanistan are still being dealt with.China is North Korea’s ally, but as I explained it’s like a father-son relationship. NK depends upon China to tell it what to do in many ways, and China has the power to stop it doing certain things if it really wants to. Was this answer helpful?

Оставить комментарий